Saturday, August 30, 2008

How to buy a used Car at low cost

To buy a used car is a great idea for saving money. Everyone knows that a new car lost 65% of its value in the first 5 years. But the case would be more extreme for a 1 to 2 years old car, it will lost its value 30-40%.

If you don’t mind to drive a used car (I mean a 2 to 5 years old car, it looks pretty new) rather than a new car, you may save much money to pay many other bills. If you want to keep the car not too old, you may resell it after driving for 2 to 3 years and buy another newer one. The value of the car will only drop 15% or less for a 5 years old car. Therefore, your driving cost for 2-3 years would only be 10-15% of the car’s original value.

The price quote above was only the price you buy from an ordinary car dealer. However, you can buy it much cheaper through some special channel.

Have you ever heard that around the country, hundreds of thousands of vehicles get repossessed by various institutions ranging from banks to US Customs, and everyone of those cars is going to be sold at an auction, online or traditional. Usually, before, only car dealers with a special license could benefit from these incredible savings, however, with a membership at some special organization, you can join the ranks of the lucky ones and find bargains that you could only dream of. Almost nothing will be out of your range as a member of this site - you will be able to get a car you always wanted but could not afford to spend so much money on.

By the way, many people may ask why wouldn't everyone buy a car this way, instead of the usual going to the dealer or classified ads routine? The secret is : because this is a very protected source of revenue for the majority of car dealerships and is not advertised to the general public. But, if you are a member you can have access rights to the direct source and buy your vehicle with up to 90% savings off the book value price.

In conclusion, buy a used car through a special organization can help you save up to 90% off the book value. You can keep the car pretty new according to the strategy I suggested. So enjoy a pretty new car with an affordable price

Guide For Buying used cars

ARA) - Industry statistics show that almost three times as many people buy used cars as buy new.

To help consumers make informed decisions in the process, the experts at CarMax, America's leading used car retailer, have put together a basic list of the things to check when buying a used car.

1. Check the vehicle's safety features.

Consider a vehicle with air bags and anti-lock brakes. Not only will they make a car safer, but insurance companies sometimes give discounts on their rates for cars with these features.

2. Inspect the mileage.

Mileage is a good indicator of the vehicle's age, and the average consumer will drive from 12,000 miles to 15,000 miles each year. A late model used car may be more cost-effective and come with many features you may not be able to afford in a new car.

3. Check the mechanical condition of the vehicle.

If you don't feel comfortable doing it yourself, have a mechanic you trust check it for you. Fluids, lights, belts, power steering, the charging system, the air conditioner, the engine cooling system, the brakes and the suspension should all be carefully inspected for any defects and wear. And don't forget to test drive the car.

4. Examine the tires.

Uneven tread wear can be a sign that the car may need an alignment, or that it has damage to its suspension. Make sure the spare tire is in working condition with no damage or excessive wear.

5. Watch for frame damage.

Seriously damaged cars may be repaired, re-titled and sold in some cases, masking a vehicle that may not be structurally sound. When looking at a used car, check for:

-- rust around the fenders and bumpers, around lights, under doors and in wheel wells

-- cracks, dents and mismatched body panels

Cars that have been previously damaged may be more likely to have mechanical problems, and do not withstand accidents as well as cars that are structurally sound.

6. Check for cosmetic problems.

Common signs of wear and tear in used cars include cigarette burns, dirty upholstery, smoke stains, and paint scratches and chips.

7. Carefully read and understand the terms of any warranty offered on the car.

Don't hesitate to ask questions of your salesperson, and be wary of hidden conditions and exclusions that may be in the fine print. A reputable dealer will answer your questions completely and explain the details of the warranty.

8. Check the price.

The actual price of the car is only one of many factors that will determine your total price. Don't forget to compare financing rates, warranty costs, trade-in values and processing fees. The different features on the vehicle can also make a price difference. For example, a car with an automatic transmission is usually going to be slightly higher in price than the same car with a manual transmission. Research the vehicle you are considering, and find out what comparable prices are for similar vehicles in your area.

9. Look for a reputable dealership.

Ask around, and talk to previous customers of the dealer to find out what their experiences were like. A good dealer is more likely to be fair and up-front in price, value and condition of its vehicles, and won't pressure you to buy a vehicle you don't want. Hassles should never be part of buying a used car. Be prepared, and know what you're looking for.

Tips for Buying A New Or Used Car

Buying A New Car: A new car is second only to a home as the most expensive purchase many consumers make. That’s why it’s important to know how to make a smart deal. Think about what car model and options you want and how much you’re willing to spend. Do some research. You’ll be less likely to feel pressured into making a hasty or expensive decision at the showroom and more likely to get a better deal.

Consider these suggestions:

Check publications at a library or bookshop, or on the Internet that discuss new car features and prices. These may provide information on the dealer’s costs for specific models and options.

Shop around to get the best possible price by comparing models and prices in ads and at dealer showrooms. You also may want to contact car-buying services and broker-buying services to make comparisons.

Plan to negotiate on price. Dealers may be willing to bargain on their profit margin. Usually, this is the difference between the manufacturer’s suggested retail price (MSRP) and the invoice price. Because the price is a factor in the dealer’s calculations regardless of whether you pay cash or finance your car — and also affects your monthly payments — negotiating the price can save you money.

Consider ordering your new car if you don’t see what you want on the dealer’s lot. This may involve a delay, but cars on the lot may have options you don’t want — and that can raise the price. However, dealers often want to sell their current inventory quickly, so you may be able to negotiate a good deal if an in-stock car meets your needs.

Trading in Your Old Car: Discuss the possibility of a trade-in only after you’ve negotiated the best possible price for your new car and after you’ve researched the value of your old car. Check the library for reference books or magazines that can tell you how much it is worth. This information may help you get a better price from the dealer. Though it may take longer to sell your car yourself, you generally will get more money than if you trade it in.

Buying A Used Car: Before you start shopping for a used car, do some homework. It may save you serious money. Consider driving habits, what the car will be used for, and your budget. Research models, options, costs, repair records, safety tests, and mileage through libraries, book stores, and web sites.

Before you buy a used car whether from a dealer or an individual:

Examine the car using an inspection checklist. You can find checklists in magazines and books and on Internet sites that deal with used cars;

Test drive the car under varied road conditions—on hills, highways, and in stop-and-go-traffic;

Ask for the car’s maintenance record from the owner, dealer, or repair shop;

Hire a mechanic to inspect the car.

Paying for the car: Most people do not realise that they have capital locked up in their property which could be used for buying that special car of their dreams.

Release the capital tied up in your home with a home owner loan. The loan can be used for any purpose, and is available to anyone who owns their home. Home loans can be used for any purpose such as, new car, home improvements, pay of store card or credit card debt and debt consolidation.

Home owner loans are available for practically any reason. One of the most common types of home owner loans on offer are debt consolidation loans where the objective is to reduce monthly outgoings to a more manageable amount. A UK Home Owner Loan is great if you want to raise a large amount; are having problems getting an unsecured loan; or have a poor credit history. Many lenders look more favourably on people who are home owners as this demonstrates a commitment to repay a large amount of money over a long period.

A UK Home Owner Loan is a cheap, low cost, loan secured on your UK home. It frees up the equity in your home for you to use on whatever you want.

You may freely reprint this information on your website provided the following caption remains intact.

“This information courtesy of Click here to see full range of loans.”

Buying Used Cars at Low Prices!

One of the most important things you can do to purchase a used car at bargain prices is to do your homework. You should check your local classified ads and see what the asking price is for the type of vehicle that you are in the market for. Make sure to get the high and low Blue Book Price on the vehicle that you are interested in. Here are some excellent sources for getting pricing:




Other resources to check with is CARFAX. They can supply you with the vehicle history report. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has a research area to check recall history on cars. We recommend that you have the vehicle you are interested in purchasing be inspected by your own mechanic prior to purchase.

Newspaper Classified Ads are a excellent place to find cars at well below retail prices. Many times, people take their cars to dealers for trade ins and are offered below wholesale prices. Many of these people will be happy to several hundreds more that what was quoted by the dealer and you will end up with an EXCELLENT BUY!

Online Auctions can be a great place to find bargains. You can shop right from the comfort of your own home. Look for auctions with no reserve, these auctions don’t have a minimum price before they will sell.

Public Car Auctions are open to the general public and do not require you to have a Dealer’s License. Public auctions can be an excellent place to purchase cars at wholesale prices. Some of these auctions are: Auction Repossessions of Credit Unions, Banks & Lending Institutions. Some public auctions also auction Police and Local Municipalities, City, State, & County vehicles.

Estate and Bankruptcy Auctions can be a very good place to purchase vehicles at wholesale prices. These auctions are usually advertised in newspaper classified section or handled by Probate Estate Auctioneers.

Government Auctions are an excellent source for bargin vehicles. They include vehicles from DEA drug raid seizures, FBI, IRS, U.S. Customs Auctions, Department of Defense, General Services Auctions, Resolution Trust Corporation, Department of Housing and Urban Development, and U.S. Postal Services.

Rental Car Companies often sell their fleets of cars by auction. They can be a great source of cars. Contact these large companies and inquire.

Dealer Auctions can be one of the best sources to cars at below wholesale prices. Most of these auctions require that you have a dealer’s license. These auctions include lease cars, trade-ins, rentals, and fleet vehicles

Consumer Tips: How To Buy A Used Car Privately

(NC)-Many people buy cars privately rather than through dealers. You can often save money going this route, however, keep in mind that if you have problems with the vehicle it may be difficult, if not impossible, to get any assistance or compensation from the vendor. Here are some more tips on how to get the best deal when buying a used car:

It's 'buyer-beware' when purchasing a used car, so, be sure to take it to your mechanic for an inspection before handing over any money. If he (or she) finds the vehicle unsafe and/or in need of repairs, determine who will pay for them beforehand and include this in your written purchase agreement.

Check for liens against the vehicle. A lien means that money is owed on the vehicle and although the vendor is in possession of the vehicle, its legal claim belongs to someone else, such as a bank. If you buy a vehicle with a lien against it, you might be held responsible for future payment. Legislation differs across jurisdictions on the consequences of buying a vehicle with a lien. It is possible that the new owner may be required to pay the money owed or alternately you may risk having the vehicle seized. Contact your provincial or territorial office of consumer affairs for information specific to your jurisdiction or to find the organization in your jurisdiction responsible for conducting lien checks.

Ensure that the person you buy the car from is its registered owner. Remember to ask for repair bills and maintenance records.

If you decide to buy a vehicle from a private seller understand that he or she could be in the business of reselling poor-quality, stolen and/or rebuilt vehicles. Some of these people, frequently referred to as 'curbers' or 'curbsiders,' may be involved with any number of other scams, such as tampering with the odometer or selling vehicles with liens against them.

The risk of curbsider scams makes it especially important that you get the used vehicle checked by a mechanic. You may want to question a mechanic you know and trust to see if the odometer has been rolled back. They can often tell by comparing wear and tear with the odometer reading.

Remember that you don't have the right to change your mind after a sale such as this. If you have problems with the vehicle it will most likely be impossible to get any assistance or compensation from the vendor. Litigation may be your only option.

As with any large ticket purchase, there's a lot to know in order to get the deal that's right for you. The sources of information about buying cars are limitless. It can be quite frustrating, and time consuming to get what you need. Until now that is. Thanks to a new Web site ( created by federal, provincial, territorial governments and their partners, Canadians now have easy access to hundreds of objective, reliable, current consumer information sources.

Everything you need to know about buying new and used cars!

Reducing our impact on the environment should be our number one priority – the car we buy makes a big difference. Our Car Buyer’s Guide is a quick and easy way to see the environmental rating of all new cars on the market. You can search for a specific car or view all the cars in your chosen category by using the list below.